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Moving Day(s)

September 12, 2010 4 comments

My goodness. Make yourself a cup of tea (with honey)–I’ve got lots to tell.

A few weeks ago, I realized that the bees were rapidly increasing in number and making it a bit challenging for all species to enjoy our postage-stamp-sized backyard. I started asking folks in our local bee group if they knew of any alternate sites. (Last year at this time there weren’t any good options.) Miraculously, the perfect opportunity presented itself. It turned out that an ideal apiary site, very close to our home, had room for another hive. Our boisterous bees have moved into new digs. And you could certainly consider the relocation a step up:

Our colony is now located on the gorgeous grounds of Arden Wood, a 12-acre Christian Science nursing facility that opened in 1930. The folks at Arden Wood, both staff and residents, have been very welcoming–and I and the bees are delighted. Here’s the apiary, pre-move:

“Move,” however, is really too small a word to describe the ordeal of transferring 60,000+ bees from one location to another. Here are some of the unanticipated highlights:

  • A full medium super can weigh close to 50 lbs. Our Tower of Beesa was seven boxes high, so the total weight of the colony was over 300 lbs. I therefore had to remove the honey supers (and brush thousands of bees off the frames), so we could carry the boxes separately.
  • In order to close up the hive with as many bees as possible, the transfer has to take place at night, when they’re all home. At around midnight, my beekeeping mentor and I started the final preparations. (I can only imagine what the neighbors must have been thinking.) My mentor snuck up behind the hive, quickly plugging the entrance with cardboard. He ratchet-strapped the brood boxes together, making sure they were securely fastened (!). We carried the boxes of extremely peevish bees into the back of my minivan. I tried to ignore the shocked expressions on folks in other cars as I (in full bee suit and veil) gently drove the bee colony to its new home.
  • After arriving at the new site, we set the hive on its stand and then my mentor pulled out the entrance plug. He warned that they’d exit en masse and be madder than hornets. That turned out to be an understatement.
  • The next day, about 30 bees were clumped in our backyard, right in the spot where the hive had been. I felt bad for them, so I scooped them up and drove them over to their sisters.

A few days later, I stopped by to see how things were going. The bees seemed to be doing very well. Here’s a picture taken before we added the honey supers back on.

Whew. I’m hoping this was a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

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Happy 4th (and sixth)!

July 5, 2010 7 comments

We were away at a wonderful family camp near Yosemite (Camp Mather) over the past week. Each passing bee reminded me of our (probably 60,000) little ones back home. So it was with great excitement that I opened up the hive yesterday.

The weather has been warm for the last several days, so there’d clearly been much activity. Also, I guess a work force of 60,000 can get a lot done. The two honey supers were completely drawn out and filled with nectar. About one third of the frames already had capped honey. I’m still swarm-phobic, so I went ahead and added another super to make sure the bees have plenty of room to do their thing. A sixth box! (And still not a word from the neighbors…)

I took the Boardman feeder off. The bees are clearly bringing back a lot of nectar and pollen, and I’d rather keep the front landing as large as possible, given all the traffic.

Guardian of the Bees

June 12, 2010 Leave a comment

It’s been unusually warm the last few days–and the bees have been very busy. The third box is mostly drawn out, with lots of honey and a little bit of pollen already in place. I added the fourth box–which will be  either our second or, most likely, first honey super. No queen sighting this time, but everyone else looks great.

I don’t know if it’s the promise of honey or a sense of animal kinship, but one of our dogs has taken to spending hours staring out the window at our hive. Maybe he’s guarding the colony.

Or maybe not:

Gave bees a 1:4 sugar water bottle, since they’re still building comb.

Busy Bees

June 5, 2010 5 comments

And busy beekeeper. The gap between the boxes had become so wide that the bees were using their new side “entrance” more than the front opening. I was worried about marauding bands of robber bees taking advantage of this difficult-to-guard arrangement, so I moved all 24 frames (brood, pollen, honey, and many bees) to new boxes. I noticed that the foundation in the top box hadn’t been drawn out at all…

Two days later, as if to show me who was really boss, the bees started acting out. They gathered into a small, dense cloud outside the hive entrance. Hundreds of them started lounging around on their front porch, buzzing suspiciously. Even towards the end of the day, when they’re typically safely tucked in, there was an unusual amount of activity:

There was nothing to do but call my favorite beekeeper from the S.F. Beekeepers Association for a consult. He graciously agreed to come by today for a hive visit–and spent 2 1/2 hours with me and the colony. We rotated the first and second boxes (to give Latifah more room to lay eggs) and moved the top box’s undrawn outer frames to the inside (to encourage the bees to draw them out fully). These changes eliminated what turned out to be a crowding problem. Whew. The bees are behaving normally once more. I can sleep tonight. Thank you, beekeeping mentor!